Anonymously Access Wi-Fi from 2.5 Miles Away

Access WiFi from 2.5 miles awayAnonymity is something that seems next to impossible in this era of government surveillance. Even Tor and VPNs are no longer seem to be enough to protect user privacy. Once your IP address is discovered, your Game Over!
However, a method have been devised that not only allow users to anonymously connect to public Wi-Fi network, but also let them connect from about 2.5 Miles away.
Security researcher Benjamin Caudill has developed a device that adds an extra layer of anonymity to whistleblowers, journalists, dissidents and, of course, criminals.

Read the whole article here.

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How to Hack into Computers Using Pita Bread and a Radio

HowToHackUsingPitaThere’s a new and clever way of hacking into computers, and it can be done cheaply – Using just a radio receiver and a piece of pita bread.
Yeah, you heard it right. Security researchers at Tel Aviv University have demonstrated how to extract secret decryption keys from computers by capturing radio emissions of laptop computers.
Capturing the radio signals to steal data from a computer system is nothing new. But the process required expensive, bulky lab equipment to accomplish.
However, the Israeli-based researchers team managed to do it with cheap consumer-grade components as well as small enough to hide inside a piece of pita bread.
Using cheap equipment, the team of researchers, including Daniel Genkin, Lev Pachmanov, Itamar Pipman and Eran Tromer, was able to capture keystrokes, applications running on a computer system, and encryption keys.

How the method works?

Read the complete article here.

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How Microsoft Can Spy On You And How To Stop It

Microsoft spyThis Article will explain how they spy on you and how you can stop Microsoft from getting your IP Address without your permission.

How Microsoft Can Spy On You?
The answer is simple, via their NCSI ( Network Connectivity Status Indicator ).

Why should we care of it?
Well… each time we start our Windows Computer an Internet connection test is run automatically to test the Internet availability.

So each time we start it, our PC makes a connectivity request to a text file into the NCSI Server of Microsoft ( 131.107.255.255 & dns.msftncsi.com ).

The Text file should be located here:
http://www.msftncsi.com/ncsi.txt

Where’s the fun part?
Microsoft admitted that they DO NOT NOTIFY the user Before attempting to collect informations, infact it is automatically done if you have the Internet!.

Read the complete article here.

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See you at dev.Objective() in mid-May (I’ll be speaking) – Charles Arehart

Charlie ArehartJust wanted to share word (sorry it took so long) that I’d been selected as a speaker at the upcoming dev.Objective() conference, in Minneapolis in Mid-May. Hope to see lots of my fellow CFers there, and of course new folks who were not CFers.

While the conference name has changed (from cf.Objective()), there are still plenty of CF-oriented topics, and of course as nearly everyone would point out, it’s good for everyone to expand their reach and focus.

To that end, I’ll be doing a topic a bit different than my normal focus of CF server troubleshooting. Instead, recognizing that there will be folks there who either use other servers, or develop web apps or mobile apps, I’ll do a bit of a “soft” topic on how to troubleshoot performance problems more generically, in:

  • Hey, my web app’s slow. Where’s the problem?
  • Check out Dan Wilson’s complementary talk
  • I’ll also do a sponsored talk for the FusionReactor folks
  • And there are several dozen more great talks at this great conference

Read the complete article here.

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CF911: Help, How do I connect sites to a new instance w/ the ColdFusion 10/11 webserver config tool?

Charlie ArehartURL: http://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2015/2/26/cf911_connect_sites_to_an_instance_with_wsconfig

This one causes a lot of heartburn for folks: you add a new instance in CF10 or 11 (in editions other than Standard, which do support adding instances), and you find that you can’t seem to have the web server configuration tool (wsconfig) connect sites to that new instance(s). You never see the new instance listed in the UI of the wsconfig tool. What gives?

The solution is relatively easy, and the problem could maybe be fixed (or at least warned about) by Adobe (and I just filed a bug report for it). Until that happens, I wanted to share this. For more, read on.

[Continued at Blog]

 

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Elaborating on an Adobe blog entry today, related to tweaking CFCLASSES to solve slow CF startup

Charlie ArehartURL: http://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2015/1/30/elaborating_on_an_Adobe_blog_entry_today_re_ cfclasses
The fine folks at the Adobe CF blog posted a blog entry today, on “Sometimes ColdFusion services refuse to start normally post server restart” (by Rahul Upadhyay), which offers some helpful information on one possible solution to the stated problem.

That said, there are some concerns I have, with respect to how I fear some may read and take action based on it (especially the notion of deleting the cfclasses files, as a possible solution to the problem). I’m not contradicting Rahul, just elaborating on some points, as someone who (like them, perhaps) helps people with CF server troubleshooting every day.

I started to write these thoughts as a comment there, and (as often happens) it grew long so I thought it better to be a blog entry rather than a long comment, and point people here. Once I did that I decided to go further still, hoping to really help those interested to consider the issue more carefully. (It also gives me a chance to highlight again the Adobe CF team blog, something I recommend EVERYONE reading this should follow!)

By Charlie Arehart

[Continued at Blog]

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CF911: “Help! I’ve updated the JVM #ColdFusion uses, and now it won’t start!”

Charlie ArehartHas this happened to you? You follow some resource on the web showing how to update the JVM CF uses to a new version, and then wham, CF won’t start. And now you may be stuck wondering, “what happened? how am I supposed to fix this?”

It’s a tragic position to be in. (I was tempted to title this, “Help. My JVM has fallen and CF can’t get up”, but I fear that dated and veiled 80’s reference would go over the heads of many of my readers.)

The thing is, there are several reasons why your attempt to update CF’s JVM can fail, and fortunately I can offer several things you can look at to hopefully quickly recover from or undo things. If you’re interested, read on.

Read the entire article here.

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The price for ColdFusion troubleshooting consultants is a joke. They’re taking us for a ride

Charlie ArehartURL: http://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2014/12/6/on_the_cost_of_CF_troubleshooting_consultants
Ok, so that’s clearly not my sentiment but rather that of a certain “Simon” (no other identifying info offered) in a blog comment in one of the recent CF team blog entries.

After complaining about how poorly he felt CF had responded to his seeking help, he threw in additionally that “the existing private consultants prices are a total joke – they are taking us for a ride!”.

Well, I just couldn’t let go his comment go unremarked.

I started to write my reply there, but it grew long (as is my wont). But rather than post there (where most comments are brief), I decided to post it here instead and point to it there. Perhaps some of my readers here may appreciate it as well, as I also talk about some thoughts on CF troubleshooting in general.

Read the complete article here.

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Hidden Gem: Importing CF Admin settings in ANY release via “import wizard”, even AFTER installation

Charlie ArehartURL: http://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2014/11/11/import_cfadmin_settings_anytime_using_import_wizard
Have you ever faced the challenge of needing to migrate the CF Admin settings (datasources, mappings, scheduled tasks, etc.) from one machine to another? You may know of a couple of solutions (the CAR mechanism and the “import wizard” which runs at the end of installation).

But what if those solutions don’t work for you? Or what if you didn’t know of them before installation, and now you have dozens of dsn’s, scheduled tasks, mappings, or other settings you want to get from one machine/release to another?

You are NOT stuck having to manually copy settings from one screen to another! (And you should be very careful about the common hack solution of copying neo*.xml files from one instance to another, which may not always work and may break things.)

In this entry I’ll discuss how you CAN indeed import the CF admin settings from ANY release of CF into ANY OTHER release of CF, in a fully supported way, and which CAN be done even after installation of a new CF release.

I’ll also mention an important potential gotcha to beware, as well as how to to get around that.

[Continued at Blog]

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Hidden Gem in ColdFusion 11: ColdFusion Archive (CAR) support now in Standard

Charlie ArehartURL: http://www.carehart.org/blog/client/index.cfm/2014/11/11/cf11_hidden_gem_CF_archives_in_standard
Here’s a nice surprise for some about a change in CF11: you can now create and read CAR files (ColdFusion archive files, a CF Admin feature) in the STANDARD edition of ColdFusion 11. In prior releases, it was available only in ColdFusion Enterprise.

Read on for more, including a gotcha regarding importing from previous release Standard editions, but for many this news will be a delight and all they need to know.

For more on what the CAR mechanism is, finding more on it, the gotcha (and what NOT to do if you hit that gotcha), and info on still more hidden gems in CF, read on.

What the CAR mechanism is for

I don’t want to rehash what’s already well-documented in both the CF docs and various blog entries and articles, so I’ll point to those in a moment.

But briefly, the CAR mechanism has been a feature in the CF Enterprise Admin “Packaging & Deployment” section, and it allows one to easily export some or all settings of one CF admin into a single zip file (a “.car” file), which can then be imported into another CF admin. It’s a point and click interface (though its UI has its challenges, so see the resources below to better understand it before trying to use it.)

It can be great whether you are moving settings from one machine to another. It can even help with migration of settings from one release to another, though CF does that for you if you install a new release on a machine with an old one, in which case the Migration Wizard option is offered as a last step of installation.

Read the rest of this entry »

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