Steve "Cutter" BladesWell, it’s that time again. Later this week is the second annual ColdFusion Summit, put on by Adobe. Last year, just prior to the summit, I posed the question What’s Wrong With ColdFusion. The feedback was immediate, and intense, with many people weighing in with their thoughts on what could be done to progress ColdFusion, both as a platform and a language.

Unfortunately, last year I wasn’t able to attend the summit, and development of the ColdFusion 11 server was nearly complete, so most of that feedback had zero impact on the new release. While their were many advancements in security and JSON processing, some of the other introductions were seemingly underwhelming, or even unwanted, to many long time CF developers.

Now, to be fair to Adobe, and the ColdFusion product development team, they do have a responsibility to cater to their paying customers. Developers are rarely the ones buying the server itself, and the money handlers buying the server licenses rarely have enough real understanding of the development process to truly provide reasonable feedback when asked “What do we do next?”

Read the entire article here.

Leave a Reply